Archive for December, 2013

Strategic Sourcing, what is it all about?

December 17, 2013

Strategic sourcing processes introduced in the mid-nineties have proven to be so robust that even today they remain broadly similar.

This quick overview is not an absolute step-by-step template, because each organisation is unique and each deployment, although broadly similar, will be unique. It is not designed as a one-size-fits-all approach as this will not align your sourcing strategies with what your organisation wants to achieve. One thing that has been learnt from multiple deployments is that successful organisations drive deployment of strategic sourcing in their own way. 

Definitions

stra·te·gic [struh-tee-jik] – adjective

1. Helping to achieve a plan, for example in business or politics;

2. Pertaining to, characterised by, or of the nature of strategy: strategic movements;

3. Of an action, as a military operation or a move in a game, forming an integral part of a stratagem: a strategic move in a game of chess.

sourc·ing [sawr-sing, sohr-] – noun

1. Buying of components of a product or service delivery from a supplier.

Strategic sourcing is an integral part of a wider business strategy to improve profitability and, in turn, shareholder value. It is directly linked and specific to the business, and illustrates opportunities within the supply base to either reduce cost or increase the value of products or services required by the business. Typically, it includes demand management and supplier management. However, increasingly it is becoming important to factor in total cost of ownership (TCO) and sustainability. 

Demand management

Understanding the specification and volume requirements from the business ensures that needs can be appropriately met and that resources are not being wasted. Demand management is not about reducing contract volumes. Rather, it is about ensuring that contract volumes are appropriate for meeting the needs and objectives of the organisation. A core process that will contribute to the strategic sourcing plan is the sales and operations planning process (S&OP).

The S&OP is an integrated business management process through which the business continually achieves alignment and synchronisation between all functions of the organisation. It generally includes:

• an updated sales plan;

• a production or delivery plan;

• inventory holdings;

• customer lead times and commitments;

• a new product development plan;

• a strategic initiative plan;

• a financial plan.

The strategic sourcing team would ultimately be involved in several of these areas, to contribute towards capacity planning and to understand how each feeds into the overall plan and influences demand profiles.

Supplier Management

Understanding the capability, costs and capacity within the supply base ensures that business requirements can be appropriately matched without incurring higher costs. Systematic improvements in supplier management not only improve cost of goods and services but can also improve relationships with suppliers. This can lead to supplier relationship management (SRM) – tools and processes that enable the proactive management of an ongoing business relationship to secure a competitive advantage for your organisation.

To deploy SRM, an organisation needs to decide on a segmentation approach that considers the internal needs of the business, spend, and also accounts for risk to the business. Broadly speaking there are four high-level categories of suppliers.

Transactional suppliers are where little or no relationship or performance management activity is undertaken. Either the suppliers are utilised infrequently or the supplier is of low value to the business. These suppliers can be easily switched for another if required.

Performance-managed suppliers focus on ensuring delivery of the contracted goods and services to the required cost and service levels, rather than on building a collaborative long-term relationship.

Relationship-managed suppliers have some strategic value, so elements of SRM needs to be applied here.

Strategic suppliers are typically either business critical suppliers, or high spend suppliers. Generally the most effort is expended on this category to drive a mutually beneficial collaborative relationship. This is an effective route to improving costs through the Value Add or Value Engineering (VA/VE) process. A close working relationship with strategic suppliers also leads to a greater understanding (and reduction) of the TCO of products or services. 

Total Cost of Ownership

Understanding TCO is becoming increasingly important to procurement. Legislation concerning the environment is affecting the way we do business either through EU directives such as the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations or through corporate social responsibility programmes that drive different behaviours from the business. It is important to factor in not just the acquisition costs but also the cost of doing business with the supply base and any return flows or on-cost from recycling. 

Sustainability

The fourth element of strategic sourcing also provides part of the rationale for driving it within the organisation. Being able to sustain the supply of goods and services while de-risking the supply chain as well as balance the total costs is ultimately the responsibility of procurement.

A coherent approach

Tying all activities together into a coherent plan will transform the business, as only the procurement team can do. Internal ‘silos’ are built as a company grows. Although each silo represents the company’s acquisition of knowledge and improves the ability to deliver value to the customer, they can also create inefficiencies in the business, leading to organisational inertia. This can slow the pace of change and reduce the capability for innovation. Creating a plan balanced across the four areas ensures you will engage with the business and supply base.

When creating a communications plan, consider each of the four areas and how they might affect the stakeholder. Simple, bite-sized statements work well for those in more senior levels of the organisation. However, greater detail will be needed for others, especially where they perceive they might have to change what they do. Build in the wider plan, so each stakeholder can see all issues and organisational levels have been considered.

Develop your plan and highlight the best solutions for each area of the business. Consider using a SWOT analysis (see below) to develop the ideal outcomes.

 

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Risks to Avoid or Manage before they become issues on Business Systems Implementations (SAP Specific)

December 15, 2013

Dr.Dot's Daily Dose

Specifically, the SAP system has been implemented successfully in at least 50000 customers globally. The Majority of project failures are not related to the product or software but tied to the project execution, the software implementation partner or just the people themselves.

This brief will help you maximize your chances of a successful SAP implementation and you are more than welcome to discuss with me any specific questions you may have about managing risks on your SAP project.

Risks and issues are part of any and every major Business transformation project. Put in perspective of large business transformation projects which involve the larger ERP’s (SAP and Oracle) but not limited to, these risks and issues can be huge which could destroy the entire project if not managed and mitigated in a timely manner. Most of these risks and issues discussed here are applicable to any Business System implementation project. However…

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Lost Years and Kilo’s

December 13, 2013

Digital Oman Lose 12 Kilos

It is now nearly a decade ago when I wrote about dumping the laptop in favour of the PDA (Personal Digital Assistant), then they were all the rage and you could do almost anything you needed to as long as you put a little thought into it before you travelled. Not so these days with tablets and smart phones, you have everything at your disposal and if you don’t have it on your tablet or smart phone look it up in the App store, its bound to be there.

I am still travelling throughout the globe with an iPhone and now an iPad Air. With both of these devices I have got everything at my fingertips, even documents that I have built previously I can now store in the cloud and pull them down at will. A good travelling companion is Dropbox which stores almost anything, pictures you have taken, video’s and documents as well. What software do I travel with, well using apple products now I use pages for word processing, numbers for spreadsheets and of course keynote for presentations. All of these products are compatible with the Microsoft Office products and to be honest when travelling I find them much better to use whilst on the go. They do the job very well and can be converted to the MS office opposites.

Recently, I have purchased a stylus for the iPad as sometimes its easier to write the notes rather than type them in a meeting. The Adonit Jot is an extremely good stylus and has a normal pen inside as well, so you can fill in those landing cards on the plane or at the airport.

I think the only things really to consider these days is what do you want to put on your device to entertain yourself when travelling, I always put some films or TV series, music and a book or two. Obviously buy a headset that you can use with the iPad to listen to the films or music.

Finally remember that where you are going may not use the same electrical sockets as you do at home. You can purchase good converters for all countries these days or you can buy for the iPad and iPhones special travel packs of plugs to fit the chargers. All in all, i travel with a lot less these days than I ever did before, what will happen next I ask myself.

The high cost of misalignment between MRO Supply Chain and Maintenance Strategies

December 4, 2013

The misalignment of MRO Supply Chain and Maintenance Strategies can result in increased operational, safety, and compliance risk and significantly impact production and profitability in asset intensive industries.

 A solid asset data foundation and an effective Asset Data Governance process as part of an overall Asset Lifecycle Information Management Strategy can help to minimise these risks, improve asset availability and increase profitability.

 Competing Interests And Misaligned Strategies

 Hundreds of millions of dollars are spent annually in asset intensive organisations performing projects to optimise maintenance and reliability strategies. Designed to improve asset reliability and performance, these projects typically result in a set of recommendations that outline the specific maintenance activities that should be performed, the recommended frequency of performance, and strategies to monitor performance for ongoing continuous improvement. These studies are normally commissioned by operations and maintenance stakeholders responsible for production and asset availability.

Separately, companies spend billions of dollars each year performing studies focused on optimisation of their internal supply chains. These projects are commonly sponsored by executives responsible for finance and supply chain; very different stakeholders than those who commission the maintenance optimisation projects.

The MRO supply chain materials (spare parts) critical to the execution of maintenance strategies are commonly lumped in under the umbrella of the corporate supply chain optimisation initiatives.The business drivers behind maintenance strategy optimisation projects and supply chain optimisation projects are frequently disconnected and sometimes directly in conflict. This misalignment creates problems in a number of areas. First, maintenance strategy optimisation projects sometimes recommend an increase in spares inventory; not less. Secondly, inventory reduction recommendations driven from supply chain optimisation projects mostly fail to consider the impact such changes will have on asset reliability and performance.

Companies who have not established strong alignment between maintenance and MRO supply chain strategies are poorly equipped to measure the impact such changes will have on cost and asset performance and thus have great difficulty making decisions that will balance these tradeoffs in the best interest of overall corporate performance.

Organisations who have been able to establish and maintain strong linkages between maintenance strategy and MRO supply chain strategy, including effective decision support systems and processes, are much better positioned to make decisions in the best interest of overall corporate performance; rather than only supporting one or another siloed initiatives.

 A Data Driven Approach To Achieve Strategy Alignment

There are many best in class technology products and best in class processes for performing maintenance strategy optimisation available in the market. None of them are of much use without good data.Therefore, one of the first and most obvious gaps that must be addressed before trying to establish strategy alignment is data; master data. It is common (in a Brownfield environment) to discover that greater than 30% of maintainable equipment is not recorded in a CMMS tool. It is also quite common to find more than 20% of unique equipment records in a CMMS are no longer in service.

The first step in establishing alignment between maintenance and supply chain strategies is to know what is actually being maintained, or should be maintained. Performing a maintenance optimisation process on the 20% of equipment no longer in use is hardly a productive use of anyone’s time and money. This first step must include an audit to establish an asset registry that everyone trusts. The safety and compliance risks associated with an inaccurate or incomplete asset registry are huge.

The next step is to ensure that all systems of record for asset data have a common and agreed upon definition of asset criticality. The majority of maintenance strategy optimisation projects will help define and assign criticality to equipment. It is very important to ensure that this criticality finds its way to the CMMS system and is an agreed upon standard. For example; Critical – High impact from failure; Not Critical – Low impact from failure.

This is the first opportunity to align strategies by aligning goals. If an asset is defined as critical and it fails, corporate performance is impacted and everyone should care.

Next, you need to look at all critical items and identify which have Bills of Material (BOM’s).

It is common to find only 30% to 50% of critical assets have complete and accurate BOM’s. There is a BIG difference between having a BOM and having a “Complete and Accurate” BOM. A complete and Accurate BOM is one which is fully aligned with, and supports the maintenance strategy. And don’t forget that the same equipment in different operating contexts do not always have the same BOM.

Equipment BOM’s and Maintenance BOM’s should be considered as part of this scope of evaluation.

The final step in this process is a review of materials associated with critical equipment BOM’s and ensure that the material records are valid and the materials in the warehouse match the materials referenced in the information system.

Common Goals in Finance and Procurement

December 3, 2013

Here is a Re Blog, based upon observations in recent months that Both Procurement and Finance seem to have once again become silo’d and decisions are being made in isloation of each other without consultation.

Dr.Dot's Daily Dose

Procurement and Finance in businesses today are starting to realize and share the responsibility for both cost and risk reduction when it comes to reducing operating expenditures, cutting transaction costs, mitigating liabilities and identifying innovative ways to increase the Company’s profits.
The global financial recession is still with us, however many executives are beginning to listen and hear the bench¬mark performance numbers that show the types of savings that are possible from greater collaboration between Procurement and Finance.
Functional, Process automation and analytical initiatives such as e-Sourcing, P2P, Contract Management and Spend Analyses are making these returns possible. Take for example the types of returns that enhanced straight-through processing automation and change management can bring in the accounts payable function. By integrating tools and processes together in this area, procurement and finance can together reduce maverick spending, reduce potential fraud, better leverage existing contracts and lower operating costs.
Focusing on…

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